Monthly Newsletter

July 2021 Issue


 July 19, 2021

Updates & Announcements

Victor Taylor Named Director of Partnership Resources

Taylor will facilitate the implementation of strategies for corporate partnerships and other collaborations with companies.

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Other support changes and digital signatures

Those who apply to the NIH for funding should have seen an important announcement (NOT-OD-21-073) that details the new formats, introduces a new requirement that faculty electronically sign the Other Support document, and also requires that institutions collect and translate foreign contracts, grants, or any other agreement specific to foreign appointments and/or employment. To help its investigators navigate the changes, Duke has several helpful resources and tips:

As a reminder, all information in Other Support documents must be reviewed and approved by the investigator before submission to NIH. Please submit questions via the Research Help widget in myRESEARCHhome.

 

Reminder: NIH biosketch requirements, plus how to delegate!

New formats for the NIH biosketch were announced in NOT-OD-21-073. As you prepare your biosketch, there are several important things to keep in mind:

As a reminder, all information in the Other Support and Biosketch documents must be reviewed and approved by the investigator before submission to NIH. Please submit questions about biosketchs to the Research Help widget in myRESEARCHhome.

 

Resources & Tools

Navigate researcher hiring with myRESEARCHpath

Hiring procedures and allowable activities for undergrads, graduate students, and staff can be confusing to navigate. Use myRESEARCHpath to simplify the process.

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Common Data Elements promote FAIR Data Sharing

Duke is committed to assisting its faculty in ensuring that their research data meet the FAIR guiding principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable). Many of our external sponsors share this commitment. A recent article in the National Library of Medicine explains the benefits and importance of the use of common data elements (or CDEs), in meeting these principles. CDEs are standardized assessments or concepts that promote enhanced data quality, sharing, and reuse. The use of CDEs across Institutes and studies is crucial to increasing efficiency and ensuring that variability is avoided.

Read the full article here and reach out to the Duke Office of Scientific Integrity’s ASIST team or the Center for Data and Visualization Sciences for help.